Grand Meadow ISD 495‚Äč

710 4th Ave NE  PO Box 68  Grand Meadow, MN 55936  Phone: 507-754-5318  Fax: 507-754-5608

 
 

Upcoming Due Dates: 
Visual Summaries 3-5 Due March 27th 
Romeo and Juliet test on Wednesday, March 29th
Romeo and Juliet Project Due April 7th

Book Report Due March 21st, 2017
Romeo and Juliet Jeopardy

Resources
EPub for Romeo and Juliet 
PDF for Romeo and Juliet 

 


 

Romeo and Juliet
Essential Questions
  • Why do people still read Shakespeare’s work?
  • What can we learn about humanity from reading Shakespeare’s plays?
  • Do we control our own destiny? 
  • How parental relationships impact the lives of children? 
5
  • Analyze dialogue from Romeo and Juliet
  • Identify and explain examples of foreshadowing from Romeo and Juliet
  • The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare
  • Romeo and Juliet Newspaper or Radio Show Project
  • : Dramatic Irony, Foreshadowing, Tragic Flaw, Tragic Hero, Act, Scene, Line, Conflict, Cause and Effect, Protagonist, Foil Characters, Climax, Resolution, Moral, Characterize, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Plot, Analyze, Figurative Language, Parallelism,
Minnesota Academic Standards
9.11.5.5, 9.11.4.4, 9.4.10.10, 9.4.2.2, 9.4.3.3, 9.4.4.4, 9.4.5.5, 9.9.8.8                                                                                                                                                                                                                         ;
Ongoing: 
9.7.4.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 9.7.1.1, 9.7.2.2, and 9.7.3.3.)
9.7.5.5. Use a writing process to develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, drafting, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1-3 up to and including grades 9-10.)
9.7.6.6 Use technology, including the internet, to produce, publish and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.
9.7.10.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences: (a) Independently select writing topics and formats for personal enjoyment, interest, and academic tasks.
9.9.1.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9-10 topics, texts, and issues, including those by and about Minnesota American Indians, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively: (a) Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. (b) Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussion nd decision-making, clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed. (c) Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate to the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. (d) Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the e evidence and reasoning presented. 
9.9.6.6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts, audiences, tasks, and feedback from self and others, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. Apply assessment criteria to evaluate oral presentations by self and others.
9.11.1.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking: (a) Use parallel structure. (b) Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.
9.11.2.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing: (a) Use a semicolon (and perhaps a conjunctive adverb) to link two or more closely related independent clauses. (b) Use a colon to introduce a list or quotation. (c) Spell correctly.
9.11.3.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening: (a) Write and edit work so that it conforms to the guidelines in a style manual (e.g., MLA Handbook, Turabian's Manual for Writers) appropriate for the discipline and writing type.

Syllabus: 

Grand Meadow High School
English I
2016-17 Syllabus
Sue Wilson,

Course Overview
The purpose of the English I course is to enhance student knowledge of various literary and nonfiction genres, to introduce research techniques and responsibilities, and to develop an academic vocabulary and voice. The students will be expected to complete projects and homework that are assigned in class as well as participate in class discussions.
 
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the course, students will be able to…
…differentiate between various genres of text.
…explain the differences between text types.
…analyze an author’s use of a specific genre.
…understand and apply basic rules of grammar.
…utilize an academic vocabulary while writing formally.
 
Minnesota Academic Standards
The standards and objectives used for planning this course are the Minnesota Academic Content Standards for English Language Arts grades 9-10. These content standards can be found through www.education.state.mn.us, or they are available in print upon request. These content standards were used in developing the goals, content, and assessments for each English I unit.
Grading
Students will be assigned points for each assignment and project. Grades will be weighted by points instead of percentages. Example: Homework Completion Assignment = 10 points, Test = 100 points. If a student scores 90/110, their average would be 81.82%. If a student earns 436 points out of 700 possible points, they will have a 62.3%.
 

94-100% A 87-89 B+ 77-79 C+ 67-69 D+ 0-59 F
  93-90% A- 84-86 B 74-76 C 64-66 D  
  80-83 B- 70-73 C- 60-63 D-  
 
Late Work
All homework is due at the beginning of class. Homework turned in after it has been collected will be considered late. Late work can be turned in one day late with a 50% deduction. After one day, a zero will be entered in the gradebook. If a student wants to receive credit for a zero, he or she must come in after school for a tutorial lesson over the specific skill. Students who turn in an assignment to make up for a zero without coming in for the tutorial will not receive credit for the assignment. Tutorials must be completed within ten days of the assignment’s initial due date. “Practice” is not a reason to miss a tutorial.
 
Absence
If a student is not present at the time an assignment is due (excused or unexcused absence), the score will reflect a zero until the work is turned in. It is the student’s responsibility to turn in work after an absence. If a student knows about an absence in advance, he or she should follow district policy and visit with the teacher prior to being absent. If a student misses a test due to an absence, he or she must come in to take the test upon returning to school. The student should check the “While You Were Out” binder or check with a classmate to find out what he or she missed after an absence.
 
Plagiarism
According to Dictionary.com, plagiarism is “an act or instance of using or closely imitating the language and thoughts of another author without authorization and the presentation of another author’s work as one’s own, as by not crediting the original author.”
 
Beginning with the 2016-17 school year, if a student is caught plagiarizing in any class, a report will be filed and the student will face both academic and disciplinary consequences. Counts of plagiarism will compound and follow each student throughout his or her high school career. For each offense, the student’s parents or guardians will be contacted, the student must meet with the teacher of record, and the student’s grade will be negatively impacted per the teacher of record’s discretion. Additionally:
  • 1st Offense: 1-hour detention
  • 2nd offense: In school suspension
  • 3rd offense: Out of school suspension
  • Subsequent offenses: Disciplinary action will be left to administrative discretion
 
In addition to Grand Meadow’s graduated plagiarism policy plagiarizing or engaging in academic dishonesty in English I will result in
  • an automatic deduction of 50 percentage points (50%) for the first incident during the course of one academic school year.
  • the student will need to review the school plagiarism policy
  • the student will attend 45 minutes of tutorial time before given credit on the assignment.
  • no extra credit opportunities being offered to recuperate loss of credit due to plagiarism.
 Any incident during the same academic school year will result in earning zero percentage (0) points.
 
Hall Passes
Students will be allowed one hall pass per week unless there is a doctor’s note requesting otherwise. Students must sign out of the classroom with the time and desired location, and they must sign back in listing the time they return. Students MUST carry the physical hall pass with them at all times. Failure to return the hall pass will result in a student’s hall pass privilege being revoked. Only one student will be permitted to leave the classroom at any given time. If a student is visiting any location other than the location for which they signed out, they will receive a ten to thirty-minute detention. Students should not be gone longer than five minutes with a hall pass (please note, if a student is gone for five minutes, they have missed ten percent of the class time). If a student is chronically late back to class, they may be denied the use of a hall pass.
 
Technology
Cell phones are both a great classroom tool and a huge distraction. Students will be permitted to use their cell phones in the classroom for academic purposes only and with the expressed permission from their instructor. Students will be asked to use their cell phones to track assignments, check grades, conduct research, etc. If a student is using technology for any other purpose—snapchat, texting, Facebook, twitter, Instagram, etc.—the cell phone will be taken away from the student. If a cell phone is taken before lunch, the student can retrieve the cell phone after lunch. If the cell phone is taken after lunch, the student can retrieve the cell phone after they have been dismissed from their last class. If a student is chronically abusing technology (it is removed from a student three or more times in a quarter, the cell phone will immediately be taken to the office and the district policy will apply).
 
The students have a great privilege and responsibility in being assigned iPads by the school district. Should a student abuse this privilege and their responsibility, their iPad will be confiscated for the day. Abusing the privilege includes visiting inappropriate websites, playing videogames during class, watching videos during class, using social media during class, etc. The abuse of personal technology (iPads or laptops) will follow the same guidelines as the cell phone policy.
 
Please note: students should use their technology to record photos and videos only with expressed permission from the teacher or they feel they are in a dangerous situation. Taking photos or videos of other students for the purpose of bullying or humiliation is strictly prohibited and will be handled in accordance with the district discipline policy.
 

 
Expectations and Consequences
  1. Be respectful of everyone and your environment.
    1. Listen when others are speaking.
    2. Do not take anything from the room without permission.
    3. Do not write on anything in the room (other than your assignments) without permission.
    4. Be kind to people.
    5. Throw your trash away.
  2. Technology should be off and out of sight unless you have permission to use it.
    1. Please assume if your parents are calling or texting that they will leave you a message and you can call them back between classes.
    2. If it is an emergency, ask to be excused to the dome to return the call.
  3. Distracting behaviors and noises are toxic to the classroom environment. Please refrain from exhibiting these in the classroom.
  4. Discuss grades or classroom expectations after class.
  5. Comply with instructions the first time. If you have to be asked multiple times to follow a directive, it will be considered insubordination, and you may be sent to the office.
  6. All rules listed in the Grand Meadow Student Handbook should be followed.
 
Consequences
  1. Redirection
  2. Student Conference
  3. Parent Conference
  4. 30 Minute Detention and Parent Conference/Contact
  5. 60 Minute Detention and Parent Conference/Contact and Administrative Conference/Contact
  6. Administrative Office  
Year at a Glance
Unit Weeks Writing/Grammar Reading Speaking/Listening/Viewing
Formal Writing vs. Informal Writing
  • What is the difference between formal and informal writing?
  • How do we determine which style of writing to use? 
  • How does knowing our audience help us determine which style of writing to use? 
3
  • Review (Subject, predicate, noun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition)
Variety of formal/informal texts
  • Small Group Discussion
  • Whole Group Discussion
  • Create a formal presentation over an assigned topic.
  • Create an informal presentation over an assigned topic.
Vocabulary:  Punctuation, Spelling, Capitalization, Sentence Types, Contractions, Personal Pronouns, Formal letter, Informal message, Style, First Person, Second Person, Third Person, Essay, Article, Contract, Terms and Conditions, Antonym, Synonym
Minnesota Academic Standards
9.5.6.6.; 9.11.3.3.; 9.7.10.10.; 9.11.2.2.; 9.7.2.2.; 9.7.10.10.; 9.7.4.4; 9.11.1.1.; 9.11.2.2, 9.5.4.4
Research/Citation
  • MLA vs. APA
  • What is citation?
  • Why do we cite?
  • Works Cited Page
  • How do you determine source reliability?
3
  • Reliable source scavenger hunt
  • Conduct research over an assigned topic
  • Find and cite reliable sources
  • Research Papers and Journal Articles (model Texts)
  • Examples of citations
  • Share research in small groups
  • Compare and contrast findings
  • : Introduction, Body, Conclusion, Thesis, Parenthetical Citation, Source, Context, Reference, Fragment, Introductory Sentence, Supporting Evidence, Main Idea, Supporting Idea, Supporting Detail, Topic Sentence, MLA, APA, Header, Secondary Source, Primary Source,
Minnesota Academic Standards
9.5.1.1.; 9.5.8.8.; 9.7.1.1; 9.7.7.7.; 9.7.8.8.; 9.7.9.9.; 9.7.2.2
Science Writing (Co-Teaching)
  • How is writing used in science?
  • Why is it important to be able articulate an argument and use evidence to support the argument?
  • Persuasive paper defending or refuting the use of a specific alternative energy
4
  • Persuasive Arguments
  • Use sources to defend claims
  • Persuasive Research Paper
  • Create a multimedia presentation to present argument to peers
  • Science Texts
  • Academic Articles
  • Articles from academic databases
  • Presentation to present arguments
  • : Persuasive Argument, Persuasion, Secondary Sources, Primary Sources, Summarize, Paraphrase, Quotation, Quote, Revise, Revision, Argue, Arguments, Compound Sentence, Comma Splice,
Minnesota Academic Standards
9.11.6.6, 9.5.1.1, 9.5.2.2, 9.5.4.4, 9.7.1.1, 9.7.7.7, 9.7.8.8, 9.7.9.9
Mythology, Legends and Tales
  • Why do we use creation stories?
  • What do myths reveal about a culture’s values?
2
  • Explain what the purpose of a creation story is.
  • Quickwrite: How was the earth made?
  • Read Creation Stories
  • Find similarities
  • Research Gods and Goddesses of Greek Mythology
  • Create and present a one-pager over assigned god/goddess
  • Write an essay comparing glorification of sports/pop culture idols to the use of heroes in mythology.
  • “Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment”
  • : Characteristics, Fiction, Non-Fiction, Stanza, Figurative Language, Literary Device, Literary Element, Symbolism, Assonance, Imagery
Minnesota Academic Standards
9.4.2.2, 9.4.7.7, 9.7.9.9
Odyssey
  • How do the traits of a legendary hero exemplify the values of the culture from which the legend originated?
  • In what ways do myths illustrate the belief systems and customs of the cultures that create them?
2
  • Depth Charging: Write a cautionary tale
  • Quickwrite: What characteristics does our society value in people? Evidence from popular culture?
  • Parodies/Parallels of The Odyssey
  • Comparison/Contrast
    • Why are parallel/parodies created? What makes the story remain popular?
  • Hero’s Journey (TedEd)
    • Comprehension
    • Application
  • Star Wars
  • : Tone, Poet, Stanza, Simile, Imagery, Foreshadowing, Dramatic Irony,
Minnesota Academic Standards
9.4.7.7, 9.4.9.9, 9.7.9.9                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          ;
Short Stories
  • How is the short story an extension of oral story telling?
  • How do authors use the genre of short story in order to express their hopes and fears for their own society? Is this important?
  • How could the short story be a tool used to enable change?
5
  • Literary Comparison
  • Creative Writing: Writing a Short Story
  • Direct Object
  • Indirect Object
  • Depth Charging
  • Suspense
  • “The Most Dangerous Game”
  • “The Cask of Amontillado”
  • “The Demon Lover” English IV book
  • “Thank You Ma’am”
  • “Everyday Use”
  • Short Film “Lights Out”
  • : Introduction, Rising Action, Climax, Falling Action, Resolution, Conflict, Protagonist, Antagonist, Seven Character Types, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Creative Writing, Peer Review, Story, Voice, Syntax, Diction, Antonym, Synonym, Climax, Resolution, Figurative Language, Parallelism, Perception, Stereotypes, Character Types, Dynamic, Static, Foil, Round, Flat, Stock, Confidante, Tone, Voice, Sequence
Minnesota Academic Standards
9.4.10.10, 9.4.2.2, 9.4.3.3, 9.4.5.5, 9.4.6.6, 9.4.9.9, 9.7.1.1, 9.7.3.3, 9.7.7.7, 9.7.9.9                                                                                                                                                                                                      ;
Persuasive Writing
  • How does writing persuasively impact the writer? The reader?
  • Advertisements 
3
  • Complex Sentences
  • Dependent Clause
  • Independent Clause
  • Semicolon
  • Speech transcripts
  • Editorial
  • Scientific Journal Article
  • Documentary
  • Mockumentary
  • Commercials
  • : Edit, Supporting Detail, Topic Sentence, Run-On Sentence, Complete Sentence, Revise, Revision, Quotation, Quotation Mark, Compound Sentence, Semicolon, Tone, Explanation, Declarative Sentence, Thesis Statement, Prewriting, Persuasive Argument, Supporting Evidence
Minnesota Academic Standards
9.11.6.6, 9.5.4.4, 9.5.5.5, 9.5.6.6, 9.5.7.7, 9.5.8.8, 9.7.1.1, 9.9.3.3                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
Non-Fiction
  • Why is it important to label a text as fiction or non-fiction?
  • How does a text’s genre affect how we read the text?
  • How does non-fiction help us understand history and humanity better?
2
  • Descriptive Writing
  • Procedural Writing
  • Literary Nonfiction
  • Deliver an Informative Speech
  • Deliver a Procedural Speech
  • Write and produce a documentary about an issue affecting the community
  • : caption, inform, purpose, summarize, reference, secondary source, primary source, editorial, column, news article, media, medium, advertisement, speech
Minnesota Academic Standards
9.5.10.10, 9.5.2.2, 9.5.5.5, 9.5.6.6, 9.5.9.9, 9.9.3.3, 9.9.8.8, 9.9.7.7,                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
To Kill a Mockingbird
  • What causes differences between one person’s justice and another’s injustice?
  • Does justice apply equally to the rich and the poor?  To the white and non-white?  To the socially prominent and the social outcast?  To the male and the female?  To the adult and the child?
  • Where do we draw our lines concerning with whom we deal justly and with whom we do not?
  • Should we change the way our society deals with all citizens?
6
  • Reflection of court trial
  • Quick-write
  • To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee
  • Background Information on Harper Lee and racial issues in Alabama
  • Philosophical Chairs
  • Fishbowl Discussion
  • Scottsboro Boys Video and Worksheet
  • : Stereotype, Characterization, Reliable Narrator, Context, Connotation, Denotation, Novel, Symbolism, Scene, Intent, Sequence,
Minnesota Academic Standards
9.11.4.4., 9.11.5.5, 9.11.6.6, 9.4.10.10, 9.4.2.2, 9.4.3.3, 9.4.4.4, 9.4.5.5, 9.9.2.2                                                                                                                                                                                                           ;
Romeo and Juliet
  • Why do people still read Shakespeare’s work?
  • What can we learn about humanity from reading Shakespeare’s plays?
  • Do we control our own destiny? 
  • How parental relationships impact the lives of children? 
5
  • Analyze dialogue from Romeo and Juliet
  • Identify and explain examples of foreshadowing from Romeo and Juliet
  • The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare
  • Romeo and Juliet Newspaper or Radio Show Project
  • : Dramatic Irony, Foreshadowing, Tragic Flaw, Tragic Hero, Act, Scene, Line, Conflict, Cause and Effect, Protagonist, Foil Characters, Climax, Resolution, Moral, Characterize, Direct Characterization, Indirect Characterization, Plot, Analyze, Figurative Language, Parallelism,
Minnesota Academic Standards
9.11.5.5, 9.11.4.4, 9.4.10.10, 9.4.2.2, 9.4.3.3, 9.4.4.4, 9.4.5.5, 9.9.8.8                                                                                                                                                                                                                         ;
Ongoing:
9.7.4.4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 9.7.1.1, 9.7.2.2, and 9.7.3.3.)
9.7.5.5. Use a writing process to develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, drafting, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1-3 up to and including grades 9-10.)
9.7.6.6 Use technology, including the internet, to produce, publish and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.
9.7.10.10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences: (a) Independently select writing topics and formats for personal enjoyment, interest, and academic tasks.
9.9.1.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9-10 topics, texts, and issues, including those by and about Minnesota American Indians, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively: (a) Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. (b) Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussion nd decision-making, clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed. (c) Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate to the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. (d) Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the e evidence and reasoning presented.
9.9.6.6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts, audiences, tasks, and feedback from self and others, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. Apply assessment criteria to evaluate oral presentations by self and others.
9.11.1.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking: (a) Use parallel structure. (b) Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.
9.11.2.2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing: (a) Use a semicolon (and perhaps a conjunctive adverb) to link two or more closely related independent clauses. (b) Use a colon to introduce a list or quotation. (c) Spell correctly.
9.11.3.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening: (a) Write and edit work so that it conforms to the guidelines in a style manual (e.g., MLA Handbook, Turabian's Manual for Writers) appropriate for the discipline and writing type.
 
 

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Contact: Sue Wilson